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The Eyrie Vineyards

The Beginning, Middle and End: Benchmark Willamette Valley
The Eyrie Vineyards

Put simply, Eyrie is an Oregon legend. In 1965, founder David Lett planted Willamette Valley’s first vines, and today, almost 60 years later, the estate remains the benchmark. With big shoes to fill, Jason Lett, a qualified agronomist, returned to the estate in 2005 to take the reins. Though he’s doing many things differently from his father, not least due to the changing climate, Lett Jr’s DNA is woven through with that same cerebral philosophy and seemingly telepathic relationship with these vines.

Nestled in the Dundee Hills between the Coast Range and Chehalem Mountains, Eyrie’s vines span 26 hectares across five exceptional sites. The vineyards lie at ever-increasing altitudes ranging from the Sisters vineyard at 67 metres to Daphne at 260 metres, with the Outcrop, Roland Green and original, 1965-planted Eyrie sitting in between. The change in elevation plays a critical role here; the higher you go, it gets windier, cooler and more volcanic, and site signature gains greater dominance over varietal expression.

All the vineyard work is done by hand by a small crew of seven, and each vine is visited 12 to 15 times throughout the year. The farming philosophy is unchanged from the 1960s, with activities now considered cutting-edge elsewhere a historical mainstay at this estate: organic dry-farming, cover crops, no-till agriculture and a complete absence of insecticides, herbicides, systemic sprays or fertilisers.

This estate's Pinot Noirs and Chardonnays are considered among the world's finest. To give you some idea of how good (as if the commentary below is not enough), last year's allocation sold out before we could send our offer. Tasting is believing! In short, they are striking, classical expressions of grape and site, crafted in a taut, age-worthy style that seduces with finesse and aromatic complexity rather than brute force and flamboyant fruit. Eyrie's other claim to fame is its celebrated Pinot Gris. David Lett planted America's first commercial Pinot Gris vines in the Eyrie Vineyard in 1965, and the wine is still considered the Platonic ideal of Willamette Gris. Yet, Eyrie's pioneering spirit extends beyond the classics; their lower-lying Sister vineyard is home to future-proofing and experimental plantings of, among others, Meunier, Trousseau, Chasselas, Pinot Gris and Pinot Blanc.

In the cellar, Jason has a "trust-the-must" approach. "The vines will take care of you. As a winemaker, you can get distracted by the noise and second-guess yourself,” he says. “These vines are deeply rooted and harmoniously engaged with the ecosystem around them. They're smarter than I am about how the vintage and vineyard should express itself. The vines have us. I suppose that's the blind faith part of it." This respectful approach translates to minimal racking, extended lees contact, natural fermentations, and lees aging in old oak, including some barrels still in use from Eyrie's original 1970 vintage.

For more on the history and practice of this pioneering domaine, click here. Eyrie also publishes very detailed notes on its own website.

The Wines

The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Gris 2021

The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Gris 2021

Eyrie Vineyards pioneered Pinot Gris in the Willamette Valley and arguably the New World. David Lett planted America’s first commercial Pinot Gris vines in the Eyrie Vineyard at the same time he was putting his Pinot Noir vines in the soil. Eyrie set the bar and remains at the pinnacle of Gris production in the area. Eyrie takes the long way around when it comes to Pinot Gris, aging wines on lees for up to four times longer than many of their more commercial competitors and allowing full malolactic conversion. The result is wines of supple texture complementing fresh acidities and incredible ageability.

Pinot Gris is a core tenet of the Eyrie tale, and plantings have increased due to demand. Pinot Gris vines can now be found in the Roland Green, Sisters and Daphne vineyards, as well as the original 1965 Eyrie Vineyard plantings. The 2021 season was warm, with long, dry periods punctuated by short spells of rain. The summer was warm but brought into balance by a cool close to the season in September and October. Chilly nights preserved acid freshness throughout, something Eyrie values deeply. Handpicked fruit is destemmed, pressed and fermented in stainless-steel tank. The wine sees full malolactic conversion and rests in tank for 11 months on lees before bottling.

“The 2021 Estate Pinot Gris is savory and expressive, offering aromas of mushroom powder, apple pie, lilac and flint and opening to honeyed bass tones as it spends time in the glass. The medium-bodied palate is bursting with honeyed, nutty fruit framed by rounded acidity, and it finishes long and pleasantly grippy.”
94 points, Erin Brooks, The Wine Advocate
“Pouring a silver straw hue, the 2021 Pinot Gris Estate is fresh with white flowers, white peaches, and wet stones. Medium-bodied and juicy, it fills the palate with pure, fresh fruit, a soft, stony texture, and a long, clean finish.”
92 points, jebdunnuck.com
The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Gris 2021
The Eyrie Vineyards Chasselas Doré 2021

The Eyrie Vineyards Chasselas Doré 2021

Eyrie’s Sisters Vineyard is the lowest site of the estate and is home to seven varieties, including Chasselas. Jason Lett chose this site for his experimental plantings due to its low elevation: the higher you go in the Dundee Hills, the more variety takes a backseat to site expression. For instance, compared to the powerful 260-metre-high Daphne site, Sisters at 67 metres—with its slightly alluvial silt soils—is a gentle site, allowing the variety to shine brighter than place.

The Chasselas was a happy accident. One rogue vine was included in a batch of Muscat plantings sent from UC Davis. It was only noticed when a friend of the family, who just happened to be a Swiss vine researcher, noticed the outlier when walking through the vineyard. “Oh, Chasselas!” he exclaimed.  They took cuttings, planted a small block and spent many heartbreaking and frustrating years trying to figure out how to make it taste delicious. Jason finally cracked the code in 2013 when he picked it at 10% potential alcohol rather than 12%―at which the wine was continually underwhelming―and it turned out perfectly: fully ripe and bursting with flavour. The 2021 chimes in at a bright, elegant 11.5% alcohol, lacking for nothing in flavour, texture, weight or sheer enjoyment. This is Chasselas the Eyrie way.

The grapes were handpicked from 12 rows of ungrafted vines and fermented in steel with full malolactic conversion and 11 months on lees.

“The 2021 Chasselas Doré has inviting aromas of apple pie, honeycomb, hay and mushroom. The light-bodied palate has a concentrated core of spicy fruit, a satiny texture, vibrant acidity and a long, pleasantly grippy finish. Pure and fresh, it will pair widely at the table. 264 cases were made.”
94 points, Erin Brooks, The Wine Advocate
“A silver straw hue, the 2021 Chasselas Dore is elegant, balanced, and savory with aromas of fresh green pear, citrus blooms, and chive. Medium-bodied, it’s silky and juicy on the palate, with a rounded feel, and has a fresh lift and saline on the finish. A beautiful and elegant wine with modest alcohol levels, it will be incredibly versatile at the table.”
92 points, jebdunnuck.com
The Eyrie Vineyards Chasselas Doré 2021
The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Blanc 2021

The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Blanc 2021

David Lett thought he had planted Pinot Blanc in the original Eyrie Vineyard back in 1965. It turns out UC Davis made a mistake (not unusual at the time), and the vines they sent were, in fact, Melon de Bourgogne. So, it wasn’t until the early 1990s that the Letts received real clones of Pinot Blanc from Alsace and planted them across three blocks in their lowest site, Sisters Vineyard. Already home to Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris, this addition completed the Pinot family plantings, hence the name Sisters.

The fruit is handpicked, destemmed, pressed and sent to small stainless-steel tanks for fermentation and maturation. As with the Pinot Gris, Eyrie ages its Pinot Blanc for three to four times longer than most others in the region, and the wine undergoes full malolactic conversion. The wine was bottled after 11 months in barrel on lees. Jason Lett tells us the extended period on lees serves a dual purpose: pulling richness into the wine, while the fruity esters bound up in the yeast hulls get released back into the wine during the later summer months, adding bright, fresh fruit character back to the wine. So, you get a sense of fullness and freshness at relatively low alcohol levels. There’s a reason Eyrie’s Blanc is considered a New World benchmark.

“The 2021 Pinot Blanc, matured on the lees for 11 months, has pure scents of ripe peach, mushroom powder, jasmine, beeswax and flint. The light-bodied palate is textural and spicy with focused acidity and a long, mineral-driven finish.”
93 points, Erin Brooks, The Wine Advocate
The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Blanc 2021
The Eyrie Vineyards Chardonnay 2021

The Eyrie Vineyards Chardonnay 2021

Eyrie’s Chardonnay story reinforces the visionary nature of its founder, David Lett. When planting Chardonnay back in 1964, he eschewed what he saw as unsuitable clones from UC Davis, choosing instead mass-selection cuttings from old vines (Draper clone, planted in the 1890s and 1930s) in California that he felt better suited to Oregon’s cooler climate. Unsurprisingly, his foresight has paid off, and Eyrie now boasts some of Oregon's oldest and most revered Chardonnay vine material. Since 2015, he has included a small portion of fruit from mass-selection vines (Wente clone and Sterling clone) planted in Sisters Vineyard in the foundational Eyrie Vineyard base.

The clonal breakdown for the 2021 Chardonnay is as follows: 61% Draper Selection from 57-year-old vines on the original Eyrie Vineyard; 26% Wente clone from eight-year-old vines in Sisters Vineyard; and 13% Sterling clone from eight-year-old vines in Sisters Vineyard. 2021 was another low-yielding season marked by warm, dry periods punctuated by short spells of rain. The summer was warm but brought into balance by a cool close to the season in September and October, while chilly nights preserved acid freshness across the board. Handpicked fruit was lightly pressed as whole bunches in a combination of antique basket press and Champagne cycle press. The juice was then gently run to primarily neutral French oak barrels (5% new) for natural fermentation. It underwent full malolactic conversion and matured for 11 months on lees with no stirring.

“The 2021 Chardonnay Estate offers exotic aromas of ripe peaches, honey, pie crust, tangerine oil and musky floral perfume. The medium-bodied palate is satiny and expansive with an impressively concentrated core of spicy fruit. Its broad, mouth-coating texture is balanced by fireworks of fresh acidity, and it has a long, spicy finish with flavor that goes on and on.”
96 points, Erin Brooks, The Wine Advocate
“Coming from relatively younger vines planted in 2013 and pouring a pale yellow hue, the 2021 Chardonnay Estate takes on delicate floral aromatics of citrus blossoms, quince, and fresh pear. Medium-bodied, it fills the palate with elegant, ripe fruit and is silky-textured, with great balance and a clean finish. Drink this refreshing, supple white over the next 5-6 years.”
93 points, jebdunnuck.com
“It’s a rich wine but elegantly so. Milk toffee apple, ripe peach and nougat and ruby grapefruit in the back, nut husk and shell, rich spices come later on, like masala mix, red apple skin, cinnamon dusted apple, peach moving into cinnamon roll and even apple pie. Yes, all sounds rich but in a satisfying way, pleasing way. With concentration and length. A decadent style.”
95 points, Kasia Sobiesiak, The Wine Front
The Eyrie Vineyards Chardonnay 2021
The Eyrie Vineyards Trifolium 2020

The Eyrie Vineyards Trifolium 2020

Eyrie’s Trifolium brings together all three red varieties grown on its five estate vineyards. Some unwelcome rain at flowering decimated yields for the Eyrie team in 2020, leaving them 60% down overall. So, Jason decided to blend all his reds from the season into one wine. It’s important to note that Jason considers the quality of the vintage among the very best he’s seen. We’ll let him explain: “The density and concentration of this vintage are like nothing we’ve ever seen, putting even vintages like 1988 and 1998 to shame. Yet due to the cool summer, the natural acidity is as close to perfect as we could ever hope for, and alcohols are modest.”

What you’re getting with the Trifolium is Eyrie’s best Pinot Noir fruit (so the Willamette Valley’s best Pinot), including the material that would usually make the flagship single-vineyard bottlings, combined with Meunier and Trousseau, from an excellent vintage.

The blend is Pinot Noir (77%), Trousseau (15%) and Meunier (8%), picked by hand, destemmed and fermented in a range of vessels. Punch-downs were done by hand twice daily, and the wine matured for 28 months in wood, 17% of which was new.

“This blend of Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier and Trousseau is the poster child for balance. The show starts with blackberry and thyme aromas, along with notes of earth and citrus. The Trifolium's zingy acidity and optimal tannic structure support flavors like black cherry, cocoa nibs and a nice pot roast. Best trio since Rush.”
95 points, Michael Alberty, Wine Enthusiast
The Eyrie Vineyards Trifolium 2020
The Eyrie Vineyards Trousseau 2021

The Eyrie Vineyards Trousseau 2021

Inspired by the great wines he had tasted from Montigny-les-Arsures in Jura, Jason Lett planted the Willamette Valley’s first Trousseau Noir in 2012 in the 20-acre Sisters Vineyard. This directly south-facing vineyard is the lowest site at 67 metres, and the youngest in the Eyrie fold. It’s named after the Pinot sisters (Blanc, Gris and Noir) and is planted to seven different varieties.

Hand-picked fruit was destemmed and fermented naturally in small, open-top 11-hectolitre vessels. Ferments were hand-plunged twice daily before a light pressing. The wine was aged in old oak puncheons for 10 months. To preserve the purity and bright nature of the delicate Trousseau fruit, only seasoned wood was used, and the wine was bottled unfined and unfiltered with just moderate amounts of sulphur.

“Moving to the reds, the 2021 Trousseau Estate pours a pale, bright ruby color and is lifted with poppy red fruit, fresh flowers, and orange peel. Medium-bodied, it has a soft mineral texture, smooth and refreshing acidity, and fresh, clean lift. Long on the palate, it’s a fantastic wine to drink with a light chill over the next few years.”
91 points, jebdunnuck.com
The Eyrie Vineyards Trousseau 2021
The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Meunier 2019

The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Meunier 2019

In another first for the Lett family, David Lett planted the original Willamette Valley Meunier vines. Plantings are spread across two of the five sites—Daphne and Sisters, the highest and the lowest on the property. Daphne Vineyard is on the crest of a hill and is one of the oldest and highest sites (260m) in the Dundee Hills AVA. The soils are shallow, averaging less than 10 inches on top of the volcanic bedrock. The site is windy and cool, and as a result, the vines are small and the fruit intense. Sisters Vineyard, planted in 1989, is the youngest of the five Eyrie sites. It sits at 67 metres, faces south and has more sedimentary soils. Jason Lett describes the 2019 autumn as one of the most Burgundian he has ever seen in the Valley, meaning the rain and cooler days that usually occur in the winter arrived earlier and were more evenly spread. The moderate conditions facilitated great retention of acidity across the board. Hand-picked fruit was destemmed and fermented naturally in small vessels, ranging from one-tonne bins to five-tonne wooden cuve. Ferments were hand-plunged twice daily before being lightly pressed and aged in primarily old oak (8% new) for 22 months.

“The 2019 Pinot Meunier is expressive and detailed. It has a medium ruby color and aromas of wild red and black berries, orange peel, pipe tobacco, iodine and leather. The medium-bodied palate features restrained, mineral-driven fruit, chalky tannins, mouthwatering acidity and a long, spicy finish that calls you in for another sip.”
96 points, Erin Brooks, The Wine Advocate
“Raspberry, a liquorice note and baked plum. Light body, sleek and savoury, red apple skin and rose water lift, great acidity with iodine and seaweed aftertaste. Bitter-salty finish, fine soft tannin. Just a measure of spice with a pinch lingering on the gums. A Meunier to sink your teeth into.”
94 points, Kasia Sobiesiak, The Wine Front
The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Meunier 2019
The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Noir 2021

The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Noir 2021

The estate Pinot Noir combines fruit from Eyrie’s five estate vineyards: Sisters, Outcrop, Roland Green, The Eyrie and Daphne. All five sites are in the Dundee Hills AVA at various elevations, ranging from Sisters at 67 metres to Daphne at 260 metres. As you go higher, three things change: the soils get less sedimentary and more volcanic; it gets colder; and it gets windier. So, the Estate Pinot Noir from Eyrie is a great representation of the Dundee Hills AVA through the delicate, perfumed Eyrie lens.

All five sites are farmed organically. The team practises no-till farming and uses no insecticides, herbicides, fertilisers, cover crops or composts. It has been done this way since David Lett established Eyrie Vineyards in 1965, and little (if anything) has changed. The result is some of the state's healthiest, most diverse and organically rich soils.

The 2021 season was warm, with long, dry periods punctuated by short spells of rain. The summer was warm but brought into balance by a cool close to the season in September and October. Chilly nights preserved acid freshness throughout, something Eyrie values deeply. Handpicked fruit was destemmed and fermented naturally in small fermenters ranging from one-tonne bins to five-tonne wooden cuves. Ferments were hand-plunged twice daily before being lightly pressed and aged in primarily old oak (just 8% was new) for 15 months.

“The medium ruby 2021 Pinot Noir Estate is fresh with aromas of wild strawberries, fresh roses, and beet root. Medium-bodied and elegant, it floats across the palate with fine tannins and a delicately earthy finish. It’s a killer value and a great snapshot of what Eyrie is all about. It is hands down one of the best entry level Pinot Noir with a clear vision of what you can expect further in the range.”
93 points, jebdunnuck.com
The Eyrie Vineyards Pinot Noir 2021
The Eyrie Vineyards The Eyrie Pinot Noir 2019

The Eyrie Vineyards The Eyrie Pinot Noir 2019

The Eyrie Vineyard is home to the original Pinot Noir vines planted in the Willamette Valley by Eyrie founder David Lett back in 1965. It is also home to the hawks that inspired the name of the estate—an eyrie is a bird of prey’s nest—and that grace the label of each wine. The seven-acre site is home to three clones (Wadenswil, Pommard and Upright) of own-rooted Pinot Noir vines, planted between 1965 and 1974. The sloping site faces south, rolling east to west and rising to 125 metres at its highest point. Like the other sites in the Eyrie stable, this vineyard is farmed organically and regeneratively to ensure a healthy network of soil organisms to support the wizened vines.

The Eyrie Pinot Noir is one of five identically produced wines from Eyrie’s vineyards. The collection represents a fascinating journey from 67 metres (Sisters Vineyard) to 260 metres’ (Daphne Vineyard) elevation in the Dundee hills, viewed through the Eyrie lens. Jason Lett describes the 2019 autumn as one of the most Burgundian he has ever seen in the Valley, meaning the rain and cooler days that usually occur in the winter arrived earlier and were more evenly spread. It was a moderate season with good acid retention across the board, something Eyrie values deeply. Handpicked fruit was destemmed and fermented naturally in small open-top, 11-hectolitre fermenters. Ferments were hand-plunged twice daily before being lightly pressed and aged in primarily old oak (12% new) barrique and foudre for 23 months.

“The 2019 Pinot Noir The Eyrie, which includes fruit from 54-year-old vines, has alluring aromas of cranberries, blackberries, orange peel, mushroom powder and pipe tobacco with streaks of flint. The medium-bodied palate is soft and juicy yet loaded with detailed, concentrated fruit, and it finishes with a flourish of earthy, spicy accents.”
98 points, Erin Brooks, The Wine Advocate
The Eyrie Vineyards The Eyrie Pinot Noir 2019
The Eyrie Vineyards Daphne Vineyard Pinot Noir 2019

The Eyrie Vineyards Daphne Vineyard Pinot Noir 2019

Daphne Vineyard is the Eyrie estate’s highest, located at the top of the hill and reaching 262 metres at its highest point. Planted in 1974 to the Pommard clone, it’s home to just 0.6 hectares of Pinot Noir vines and produces intensely favoured wines from low yields of tiny bunches. Its location at the crest of a hill means its soils are very shallow, averaging less than ten inches of topsoils above large stone boulders.

Daphne Vineyard Pinot Noir is one of five identically produced wines from Eyrie’s vineyards. The collection represents a fascinating journey from 67 metres (Sisters Vineyard) to 260 metres’ (Daphne Vineyard) elevation in the Dundee hills, viewed through the Eyrie lens. Jason Lett describes the 2019 autumn as one of the most Burgundian he has ever seen in the Valley, meaning the rain and cooler days that usually occur in the winter arrived earlier and were more evenly spread. It was a moderate season with good acid retention across the board, something Eyrie values deeply. Handpicked fruit was destemmed and fermented naturally in small open-top, 11-hectolitre fermenters. Ferments were hand-plunged twice daily before being lightly pressed and aged in primarily old oak (12% new) barrique and foudre for 23 months.

“The 2019 Pinot Noir Daphne is juicy, highly aromatic and irresistible! Medium ruby, it has pure scents of raspberry and strawberry preserves, tangerine peel, Earl Grey tea leaves, star anise and tar. Light-bodied with powdery tannins and fireworks of fresh acidity, it features perfumed, crunchy red fruit and detailed floral and spice accents that fan across the finish.”
97 points, Erin Brooks, The Wine Advocate
The Eyrie Vineyards Daphne Vineyard Pinot Noir 2019

“A visit to the Eyrie Vineyards, where Jason Lett now presides, is like getting a history lesson in how wine used to be made, and some say, still should be made. From the ‘grape-growing’ through the elevage, this is an artisanal, noninterventionist, unique operation that continues to turn out some of the most fascinating wines on the planet.” Robert Parker, The Wine Advocate



“Eyrie wines are now made by Lett‘s son, Jason, who appears to have no quarrel with his father‘s aesthetic convictions. Eyrie wines have always been exemplars of finesse and nuance rather than inky-dark power, bullying fruitiness and heavy-handed oakiness. The Letts, father and son, have remained true to their school — and it‘s a fine, high-minded academy indeed.” Matt Kramer, The Wine Spectator



“David Lett pioneered both Pinot noir and its white wine cousin, Pinot gris, the two grapes that define Oregon wine today. But just as important, he established the very tone of Oregon winegrowing: artisanal, individualistic, even idiosyncratic… You can look at Oregon’s 300-plus wineries and 17,400 acres of vines and trace it to Lett. But he left more than that. He bequeathed a uniquely Oregon ‘wine genome,’ one that others now seek to copy.” Matt Kramer, The Wine Spectator

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